IT Security Professionals Take a Stand: Why They’re Divorcing Themselves from the Security Product Ball and Chain

IT Security Professionals Take a Stand: Why They’re Divorcing Themselves from the Security Product Ball and Chain

Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInTweet about this on Twitter

IT Security Professionals Take a Stand: Why They’re Divorcing Themselves from the Security Product Ball and Chain

April 25, 2017

by Glenn Hazard, Chairman & CEO

Business executives despise security – it’s often viewed as an impediment to growth and innovation – but they know they need it. On the other hand, IT security professionals thrive on security and an ecosystem of roughly 1,500 security product and services vendors that compete in a Zoolander-like fashion show, puckering up and striking poses every few minutes to show off their latest wares.

What organizations really need is a set of security functionality that works together to reduce the attack surface and reduce risk. This has traditionally been delivered through a multitude of products and services cobbled together with duct tape and fishing line, resulting in a massively complex and costly infrastructure. In addition to the massive costs, this approach continues to fuel the need for impossible-to-find security experts who can manage and maintain the infrastructure.

What more and more organizations are now realizing is that, rather than receiving the needed security functionality through an array of products and services, they can instead receive it from the cloud. Security-as-a-service not only frees up time for IT security professionals to focus on more strategic business initiatives, but it also reduces costs for business executives seeking to maximize every dollar invested in security.

As a result, what we’re seeing is an influx of IT security professionals picking up bolt cutters and snapping the chains of their traditionally product-centric approach to security. This shift is supported by a market study conducted by analyst firm 451 Research, where they sought to gain insight into the challenges and opportunities more than 300 US mid-tier companies face with respect to network security.

What’s Wrong with More Security Products and Services?
Nothing. As long as you have the personnel expertise, budget and time to dedicate to testing, procuring, integrating, refreshing and managing them. According to the study, more than 82% of respondents claimed they devote between 20 to 60 hours per week of in-house staff resources procuring, implementing and managing network security. The average mid-market organization invests an average of $461,000 per year on IT security, and nearly 40 percent of the total budget is spent on network security. These businesses also expect to increase spending on network security by an average of 10.9% over the next 12 months.

The reality is most mid-tier organizations lack the resources to keep up with this approach. Cloud, mobile and IoT adoption are only making this challenge more difficult.

Despite significant investment in network security, 63% of the respondents expressed having little to no visibility and control over all their distributed network, especially mobile devices, remote users, IoT devices and third parties.

According to the study, tackling these challenges are typically between 3-5 employees dedicated to IT security. This handful of employees are spending many hours managing the various traditional IT security products and services required to protect the network. Many organizations also rely heavily on contractors and part-time employees, as well as MSSP providers, which adds complexity to daily coordination efforts.

What’s keeping these organizations from advancing? 62% cited legacy IT. Challenges presented by legacy IT and personnel shortages are forcing organizations to look for new solutions to solve the network security and resource conundrums.

Nirvana: Automation and Centralized Security Control – From the Cloud
IT security professionals are increasingly looking to cloud-based services and new technologies to address business requirements and security challenges. In fact, two-thirds of the respondents indicated that they strongly prefer using a cloud-based security solution from a security-as-a-service provider for managing or co-managing their security. More than 70% of the respondents indicated they prefer security-as-a-service over on-premises or MSSPs.

The urgency around this shift is strong. More than 85% of the respondents in the study indicated that network security-as-a-service is “important” (within 12 months) or “critical” (within three months). Branch office enablement and optimization and threat management were cited as the main priorities for a swift shift to a network security-as-a-service solution.

The common thread between business executives and IT security professionals is that network security remains a significant business priority. The shift to security-as-a-service is not only about fleeing a complex and costly problem. It’s also about making a smart, strategic move to a delivery model that is strong and sustainable.

Ready to Talk?